Inductees

Gerald and Marlene Fagan

Gerald and Marlene Fagan

2017 Inductee

Gerald and Marlene Fagan have been a musical force in London for over 50 years. Both dedicated music professionals, their work with choirs has made an incredible impact in London and beyond. They met at the University of Western Ontario’s Music School in the late 1950s and married in 1961. In the 1960s and ’70s Gerald taught music in London, Ottawa, and Listowel, while Marlene raised their family of 5 children. Nevertheless, she always kept her hand in music, leading church choirs and accompanying for Gerald when her schedule allowed. Back in London permanently by 1978, Gerald became Coordinator of Continuing Education at Fanshawe College and built the Fanshawe Chorus, the Gerald Fagan Singers, and the Concert Players Orchestra. Over the next 34 years, they would even tour internationally. Gerald has been invited to judge at the Junos and CBC competitions, conducted for choirs across the country, and was even named a member of the Order of Canada in 2016. He retired from Fanshawe in 2012 and he is now Artistic Director of the Bach Music Festival of Canada and director of London’s newest chamber choir, Chor Amica.  Gerry acknowledges Marlene’s role in collaboration. As a skilled manager, Marlene organized every detail of the Fanshawe College Chorus activities from space rental to finances with regular accompaniment on the piano. Marlene also found time in the late 1980s and early 1990s to run a talent agency, EML International Artists Management.

Joey Hollingsworth

Joey Hollingsworth

2017 Inductee

Joey Hollingsworth is famed as a dancer, singer, writer and actor. During his stellar career, he has represented Canada internationally and lent his talents to support Martin Luther King’s message during the U.S. Civil Rights movement at events with Harry Belafonte and the late Brock Peters from the movie To Kill a Mockingbird. He made his debut on the CBC in the 1950s with the show Pick The Stars and later appeared on Razzle Dazzle and co-starred on Portrait with French-Canadian performer Joel Denis (as the first black Canadian and French Canadian respectively to co-star on CBC). Joey was the first black Canadian to perform on the Ed Sullivan Show. He was also a frequent guest appearing in over 48 episodes during the 1960s and1970s on Mr. Rogers’ Neighbourhood / Mister Rogers Show as the Dancing Salesman where his tap dancing shoes became famous. Living with his adoptive parents on Simcoe Street, Joey started tap dancing lessons as a young child. In 1946, while he was a pupil at Aberdeen Public School, he met and danced with the legendary Bill “Bojangles” Robinson at a London show. London fans remember him dancing on the cafeteria tables at Beal secondary school as a teenager or for the late Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau during an election campaign.

Uranus

Uranus

2017 Inductee

With a name that caused some radio deejays a bit of concern, Uranus formed in their hometown of London, Ontario in 1977. They bucked the current trends of arena rock and disco, preferring instead to play rock’n’roll and rockabilly, packing their favourite venues. After a slow start with their debut record in 1978, they signed with Trilogy Records in Toronto a year later, before releasing You’re So Square in 1980. On the strength of this single, the band hit the road for a highly successful Western Canada tour during which they ended up performing on CBC Television. Twice! They convinced the owners of the Blue Boot Hotel (through beer sales alone) to open their doors to the up-and-coming punk scene that was forming. They paved the way for bands like the Demics, the Regulators, and the Zellots who now have a new-wave / punk appropriate home in the Cedar Lounge. A second single, ‘The Ballad of Gilligan’s Isle’ was released, and an Eastern Canada/European tour was in the works. The band though, decided to pack it in at the height of their fame. All the members of Uranus are still active in the local music scene to this day.

Don Wright

Don Wright

2016 Inductee

It’s almost impossible to truly gauge the impact Don Wright has had on London music. At 14, he won a gold medal for his cello performance in a Canada-wide competition. He then formed a dance band with his brothers and played across Ontario. He graduated from Western University and became a teacher and was later appointed Director of Music for London schools. During World War II, Wright conducted shows for the troops. In 1946 he became General Manager CFPL radio and discovered up-and-coming country music star Tommy Hunter. With his wife Lillian he formed the Don Wright Chorus, and was introduced on-air by the legendary Guy Lombardo, a fellow Londoner. They received airplay across Canada and the United States. He honed his skills as a composer and began orchestrating and publishing music. He became known as “The Jingle King” crafting radio and TV jingles. So prolific was Don he was appointed musical director for The Denny Vaughan Show and the Wayne and Shuster Show. Western’s Faculty of Music is named after the legendary musician, composer and conductor. Don Wright passed away on June 27, 2006, at the age of 97.

Priscilla Wright

Priscilla Wright

2016 Inductee

Priscilla Wright hit it big in 1955 with her international hit single, Man In A Raincoat. The song was recorded at the CFPL radio studios with her father Don and his septet providing backing vocals. The song was such a smash hit, she was invited to sing it on the Ed Sullivan Show in July 1955 and she was selected by Cash Box Magazine as the Most Promising Artist of the Year. Priscilla’s success led to a film contract with Twentieth Century Fox and several film and concert appearances with Elvis Presley. After that, Wright took a hiatus from the music industry until the 1980’s when she teamed up with legendary producer Jack Richardson to record Michael Bolton’s “Heartbeat” hitting No. 8 on the Canadian radio charts. Priscilla Wright’s career has continued to blossom, receiving a Juno nomination as Most Promising Artist in 1993, and going on to perform with Canada’s top musicians such as Peter Apple yard, Mart Kenney, Moxie Whitney the Toronto Pops Orchestra and Hamilton Philharmonic. She has performed at the Montreal Jazz Festival and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. She continues to sing with her own band at top venues across Canada.

Sheep Look Up

Sheep Look Up

2016 Inductee

Eclectic and experimental, Sheep Look Up hit the stage in 1982. While Sheep Look Up began as a solid punk band, they soon adopted punk as an attitude, rather than a straight musical style, and ventured into other musical tastes, even creating their own electronic instruments and soundmaking devices. The band’s first release was the four-song cassette Entropic Concern which charted on Canadian university and college radio stations. The band was also featured on various alternative compilation albums including London Underground, a compilation released by CHRW FM. A self-titled vinyl EP was released in 1986 featuring four songs: “Rapture”, “Falasha”, “Big Heart” and “Spaghetti Western”. The EP received airplay on alternative radio stations across Canada. That same year they were nominated for a CASBY Award. In 1988 a rough mix of their soon to come full-length LP circulated as a demo tape. It featured four songs recorded and produced with Chris Wardman but a final version of the LP was never released. Sheep Look Up released three music videos – all garnered Much Music attention and airplay. Over the course of their career they toured across Canada and the U.S., and opened for some of the biggest acts, including The Fall, The Stranglers, Marianne Faithful, Gene Loves Jezebel, and Shriekback. They set the pace for indie bands in London and became the benchmark of their day.

Denise Pelley

Denise Pelley

2015 Inductee

Denise has performed with many great artists including acclaimed trombonist Ray Anderson, Gospel/Blues legend Jackie Richardson and Flamenco guitarist Jesse Cook. She has opened for Aretha Franklin at the John Labatt Centre in London, Ontario. Denise has performed with symphony orchestras and festivals which have included the du Maurier Downtown Jazz Festival (Toronto), Ottawa Jazz Festival, The Royal Canadian Big Band Festival (London), Bluesfest (London), Waterloo Jazz Festival and Sunfest (London), among others. Denise also enjoys acting and has been part of The Grand Theatre (London) seasons performing in the Fats Waller musical Ain’t Misbehavin’, Wang Dang Doodle with Denis Simpson and A Streetcar Named Desire. Denise’s one-woman show, Jazzabel premiered in September 2004 at the McManus Theatre (Grand Theatre), London, Ontario to sold out audiences! In October 2005 Jazzabel was performed in Washington, DC at the National Museum for Women in the Arts and in February 2006 to audiences in New York City at Urban Stages Theatre. As well, she was premiered in the February 2006 issue of O (Oprah Winfrey) Magazine. Denise’s recording credits include seven CD’s. She is honoured with being the recipient of the Queen’s Golden and Diamond Jubilee Medals. In 2003 she was named a YM-YWCA Woman of Distinction in the Arts and Heritage category. In April 2006 the Hyde Park Rotary presented her with the Paul Harris Fellowship Award, Rotary’s highest honour. In 2008 and 2014 she won Jazz Artist of the Year at the Jack Richardson awards. In February 2009 the London Black History Committee honoured Denise with the Black Community Achievement Award in recognition of her accomplishments, contributions and support to her community. Denise is a volunteer with Canadian Aid for Southern Sudan and has made eight trips to South Sudan where she helps to deliver a music and art camp for the children. She is also a volunteer with Educate the Children helping to raise funds for a school in Nigeria.

Jack Fallon

Jack Fallon

2015 Inductee

Bass player, fiddler and impresario Jack Fallon would have been 100 on Oct. 13, 2015. So it’s fitting this remarkable man of two Londons goes into the London Music Hall of Fame as a 2015 inductee. He was born in what his friend Spike Milligan of The Goon Show called “a log cabin” – a comment his sister, Sister Rosary (Irene Fallon), corrected to “a log cabin called St. Joseph’s Hospital.” Fallon is being remembered as probably the only musician – and certainly the only London Music Hall of Fame inductee – to have played with The Beatles and Duke Ellington and Lena Horne and Noel Coward and Bob Hope and Sarah Vaughan and Django Reinhardt and jazz legends Fats Navarro and Tadd Dameron and country stars Tex Ritter and Tennessee Ernie Ford and bluesmen Big Bill Broonzy and Josh White – and a host of others. Off-stage, he booked gigs for The Stones and The Beatles early in their careers. Perhaps Jack Fallon’s most widely heard track is Don’t Pass Me By, from The Beatles’ White Album. That’s Jack Fallon on fiddle in 1968, playing a sequence penned by the “fifth Beatle” George Martin. Before The Beatles had lured him out of semi-retirement, Fallon had started his career decades before in a family band playing dances and events in Middlesex County. Growing up in the Ballymote area, Fallon became part of the London dance band scene. He studied with the London Symphony Orchestra founder Bruce Sharpe and played in the Frank Crowley band. He knew future London Music Hall of Famers such as the Lombardo brothers and Alf Tibbs. Jack Fallon stayed in Britain after playing in an RCAF band, the Streamliners, during the Second World War, building on a career that began as a member of a family band playing dances in the London region. He remembered recording with The Beatles fondly. Paul McCartney was at the controls and Ringo Starr played piano. “George Martin, who I had met before . . . had jotted down the 12-bar sequence,” Fallon wrote. Years before, Fallon had been approached by the late Brian Epstein, then the Beatles manager. “Can you use them on Nov. 26 (1962)?” Epstein inquired. Fallon’s Cana agency had booked the Beatles earlier that year for 30 pounds sterling. He booked The Rolling Stones for half that amount in the same year. “They were nice guys, just Liverpool lads,” Fallon said later of the Beatles. When he first met them, the Stones were “polite . . . and neatly dressed,” he recalled. Fallon’s “highly modern-for-its-period bass playing” and “oh-so-attractive Canadian accent” – to quote British critic and cornet player Digby Fairweather – helped him make his mark from classical music at the Royal Albert Hall to jazz to pop. In 1948, Fallon toured with Duke Ellington. The great American band leader was required to use British-based musicians for a small-group tour. “Why, I’m not sure, but he took a fancy to me – in the nicest possible way, of course. Maybe it was because he could understand my Canadian accent, more than the others,” Fallon said. Based in Britain for more than 60 years, Fallon lived in London, England, with his wife, Jean (now deceased), and their family. He was granted the Freedom of the City of London, England, in 2002. Jack Fallon died in 2006. He was 90.

Garth Hudson

Garth Hudson

2014 Inductee

Garth Hudson was born August 2nd, 1937 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada to Fred James Hudson and Olive Louella Pentland. His mother played piano, accordion and sang; his father played drums, C melody saxophone, clarinet and flute, and would play piano on Christmas Eve. Garth’s family moved to London, Ontario around 1940. He grew up there and received his education at Broughdale Public School, Medway High School, and the University of Western Ontario. Garth studied piano with Miss Nellie Milligan and Clifford Von Kuster while learning theory, harmony, and counterpoint with Thomas Chattoe. He also played organ for services at St. Luke’s Anglican Church. Garth then performed with dance bands and joined a rock and roll group, the Capers, from 1958 through 1961, before becoming the music consultant, organist and saxophonist for Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks, the ace Arkansas-based rhythm and blues band, from 1961 to 1963. After leaving Hawkins, Levon and the Hawks toured on their own. Albert Grossman’s assistant, Mary Martin, introduced them to Bob Dylan, who recruited them to accompany him on his controversial 1966 folk-rock tour, and they settled near Woodstock, New York. Bob was a frequent visitor to their pink-colored house and Garth recorded their collaborations, resulting in the legendary Basement Tapes. In 1968, the Hawks became known simply as The Band and recorded their seminal debut album, Music From Big Pink. Over the next eight years, The Band continued recording and touring, releasing eight albums and performing for full houses around the world. Among the highlights of these shows for many in the audience, and the other Band members themselves, were Garth’s improvised introductions to “Chest Fever.” The Band called an end to touring with a lavish final concert on Thanksgiving 1976 as documented in Martin Scorsese’s film, “The Last Waltz.” Garth spent the next 16 years in California’s burgeoning music scene, contributing to several movie soundtracks, such as the Academy Award-winning “The Right Stuff” and Martin Scorsese’s films “Raging Bull” and “The King of Comedy,” among others. He also enjoyed recording and collaborating with other musicians on their albums. A brush fire in 1978 swept through the hills of Malibu and destroyed the Hudson’s new home, Big Oak Basin Dude Ranch, as Garth and his singer/actress wife, Maud, were making renovations. Soon after the fire experience, he composed the Music For Our Lady Queen Of The Angels, a multimedia celebrational environment created in 1980 for the 200th anniversary of the City of Los Angeles by Hollywood veteran costume and set designer Tony Duquette, including a saeta written by Ray Bradbury and narrated by Charleton Heston. Garth continued to perform with The Band frequently through the ’80s and ’90s. He moved back to the Woodstock, New York area in 1991 and recorded three CDs with The Band over the next few years. He has appeared on TV shows, such as Ed Sullivan, Bob Dylan’s 30th Anniversary, Woodstock ’94, The Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show, Conan O’Brien, Saturday Night Live, Roots 94 (NRK-TV) Norway, Puistoblues Finland. He has recorded and performed with many artists, including Norah Jones, Neko Case, Los Lobos, The Gipsy Kings, Leonard Cohen, Thumbs Carllile, Van Morrison, Muddy Waters, Marianne Faithfull, Roger Waters, Jennifer Warnes, Cyndi Lauper, Tango Man, the Northern Pikes, Kevin Hearn & Thinbuckle, Barenaked Ladies, John Sebastian, Jessie Winchester, Geoff Muldaur, Tom Rush, Livingston Taylor, Bill Conte, the Hudson Valley Philharmonic Orchestra, Moto “The Lion” Sano, Jimmy Sturr, Wild Bill Davis, Clifford Scott, Louisiana Red, Jo-El Sonnier, Emmylou Harris, Champion Jack Dupree, John Anderson, Tommy Spurlock, Sneaky Pete Kleinow and the Flying Burrito Brothers, David Bromberg, Sarah Perrota, the Indigo Girls, Richard Belzer, Sinead O’Connor, Don McLean, Keith Richards, Hirth Martinez, Levon Helm and the Barn Burners, Eric Andersen, Jonas Fjeld, Halvard Bjørgum, The Call, Todd Rundgren, Karla Bonoff, Linda Thompson, The Secret Machines, Jonah Smith, The Sadies, the Big Blue Big Band, Jimmy Vivino of the Conan O’Brien Show, Paul Shaffer of the David Letterman Show, Evan Dando & The Lemonheads, Donovan, Wilco, The Dixie Hummingbirds, and The Bauls of Bengal. Garth’s long-awaited first solo CD, The Sea To The North, was released in 2001. Garth co-produced and recorded on Burrito Deluxe’s The Whole Enchilada. He is developing a retrospective box set on Levon and the Hawks, 1956 to 1966, and contributed unheard tracks from his personal vault to Capitol Records’ six-disc The Band: A Musical History box set. Garth and Maud released their duo CD, LIVE at the WOLF (opening weekend of Wolf Performance Hall in London), as well as Garth’s CD of Music For Our Lady Queen Of The Angels. In 2007 he recorded at Daniel Lanois’s Toronto studio for Daniel’s album Here Is What Is, as well as appearing in Daniel’s Feature Documentary Film of the same name. Garth produced and released the lauded Garth Hudson Presents A Canadian Celebration of The Band in 2010 and has contributed to most of the tracks for The Beautiful Old 2013. Mr. Hudson enjoys producing, composing, arranging and performing with Sister Maud and his eleven-piece band. He lectures around the world, teaches Master Classes when his schedule allows and continues to prepare the syllabus for The GARTH HUDSON Institute featuring his innovative learning methods. • Inducted into the JUNO Hall of Fame (The Band), 1989 • The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (The Band), 1994 • Canada South Blues Society, Lifetime Achievement Award, 2002 • Hamilton Music Scene Award, Instrumentalist of the Year, 2005 • Hamilton Dofasco Lifetime of Achievement Award (The Band), 2007 • Grammy Lifetime of Achievement Award (The Band), 2008. • Blues Hall of Fame, Legendary Blues Artist, 2012.

John Noubaria

John Noubaria

2014 Inductee

He has spent a lifetime in music and his musical forte is jazz. Considered one of Southwestern Ontario’s most respected jazz musicians, John has seen and played it all. Early in his musical career he was booked out of Cleveland and Chicago and toured much of the mid-west United States. During this time he had occasion to sit in with jazz notables such as Chet Baker, Herbie Mann, and Scot LaFaro. Following a few years of road gigs in the U.S., John resettled back in London, Ontario where he currently resides. He led house groups which alternated between two of the city’s most popular night spots; the Iroquois Hotel, and Campbells. Here his trio backed some top instrumentalists and vocalists among which were jazz greats like Ben Webster, Coleman Hawkins, Wingy Manone, Bobby Hackett, Jack Teagarden, Jack Brokensha, and vocalists Ernestine Anderson, Jean Turner, Carmen McRae and others. In addition to nightly performances, John attended London Teachers College during the day. He taught with the London Catholic School Board and continued his academic studies at the University of Western Ontario. He graduated from the Faculty of Music in 1979 and retired from his teaching duties in 1993. In addition to theatre and playhouse concerts in London, Petrolia, Sarnia, Grand Bend, and Stratford, he has performed, also, at the Toronto DuMaurier Jazz Festival, the Beaches Jazz Festival, the Ottawa Jazz Festival, The Waterloo Jazz Festival, and the Guelph Jazz Festival.

Dixie Flyers

Dixie Flyers

2013 Inductee

April is a good month in Dixie Flyers country. The band was founded in London in April, 1974, 40 years ago this month. Founding members were Bert Baumbach (guitar), Dennis LePage (banjo), and Ken Palmer (mandolin). Brian Abbey (bass) and the late Willie P. Bennett (harmonica) joined soon after. Bennett stayed a Flyer until 1979. Baumbach and Palmer, who have been among the group’s lead vocalists, remained constant to the Flyers into this decade. Joining them over the years have been such fiddlers as Gordon Stobbe, Peter Robinson, and J.P. (John) Allen. On bass, there have been David Zdriluk,Donald Christopher Ingram, Luke Maynard and Rick Thompson. On banjo, the Flyers have looked to such players as David Jack, David Talbot, and the late Walter Maynard. Dobro players Allan Widmeyer (aka The Old Houndog) and Darren Parisse and harmonica player Mike Ethelston have been in the lineup, too, as in recent years have banjo player Paul Hurdle and multi-instrumentalist Blair Heddle. “We thought nothing will ever happen with this thing,” Palmer once told The Free Press. “All of a sudden, Bert got us on the Carlisle Bluegrass Canada(festival). That was by 1975. We had a year to practise for that. We met Bill Monroe (there).” The late “father of bluegrass”, Bill Monroe made it clear: “The Dixie Flyers play good bluegrass, they play it the right way.” Later, Monroe invited the young band to the famous Bean Blossom fest in Indiana. By adopting what Palmer has described as an evolutionary rather then revolutionary approach, the Flyers have been Canada’s most prominent bluegrass band, performing at festivals (Mariposa, Winnipeg, Bluegrass Canada, Festival of Friends), fairs, nightclubs and universities across the country. They have also hosted and guested on many TV and radio shows. The Flyers albums include five for Boot Records (a label created by Stompin’ Tom Connors). Their 2007 album Right on Track parlayed three Merle Haggard covers and at least two Jean Chretien mentions into one of the top London albums of the year. The Dixie Flyers join such other great London musicmakers as the Lombardo Family, Jack Richardson, Marie Bottrell and Tommy Hunter in the London Music Hall of Family, a virtual pantheon maintained at jrlma.ca.

Tommy Hunter

Tommy Hunter

2012 Inductee

Tommy Hunter was inducted into the London Music Hall of Fame on March 20, the night of his farewell concert at the RBC Theatre at the John Labatt Centre. Canada’s Country Gentleman was visibly moved by the cheers from the home-town crowd following the induction. It was part of a post-concert finale at the farewell event as Hunter ended his final Canadian tour in London on his 75th birthday. The management team invited the Jack Richardson Music Awards steering committee to make the induction a part of the night. We are honoured to have been able to do so. Hunter was a CBC-TV star, first with Country Hoedown, then with his own show, for 36 years. Hunter brought many of the biggest names in the business to the forefront early in their careers. He was always surrounded by fine musicians from fiddler Al Cherny to guitarist Red Shea and so many others. He made dozens of recordings, published a best-selling autobiography and is a member of the Order of Canada, the nation’s highest civilian honour. He is in the Canadian country music Hall and has been honoured in the U.S. As anyone who was at the final show will tell you, he has continued to excel in live performance as a singer, musician, storyteller and standup comic. Tommy Hunter left London in the 1950s as the demands of his career made him a national and then international star. London has honoured him by naming a street near Brisbin St., where he grew up, for him and saluting him at city council. Through it all, Tommy Hunter has never forgotten his London roots. At that final concert, he picked his way sweetly through his acoustic guitar spot on Wildwood Flower. It was a song taught to him by Edith Hill Adams, the East London-tied music teacher who helped the young Hunter turn his love of country music into a 60-year-plus career. Hunter praised her from the stage and there was applause. “I picked the right night to get it right,” Hunter beamed after finishing the last difficult flourish on Wildwood Flower. The JRLMA is happy to have the chance to honour him at last with the induction. We know it was worth waiting for the right moment.

Marie Botrell

Marie Botrell

2011 Inductee

Born in London, On, 18 of Botrell’s singles made the RPM Country Tracks charts. This included 5 tracks that made it into the top 10. Marie was recipient of the Canadian Country Music Association award for Remale Vocalist of the Year in 1983 and 1984. Bottrell was also a Juno nominee for Country Female Vocalist of the Year each year from 1979 – 1986. Bottrell was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 2010.

Amabile Choirs

Amabile Choirs

2010 Inductee

London is famous across Canada and known around the world for the excellence of its choral music. In announcing the inductees for the London music hall of fame, the Jack Richardson Music Awards steering committee is honoured that the Amabile Choirs of London, Canada have accepted induction into the hall as its first choir. World-class Amabile makes London musical excellence heard around the world. We are delighted to honour Amabile in its 25th anniversary season. Amabile Choirs of London, Canada is an educational program welcoming children, youth and adults who wish to develop their musical talents as part of a vibrant, award-winning choral organization. (Amabile is pronounced Ah-MAH-bee-lay). Active in London, Ontario since 1985, there about 300 Amabile choristers ranging from ages 8 to adult. Together they form a total of eight auditioned choirs (four male choirs and four female ones) plus two ensembles. The Amabile Youth Singers (AYS) was the first choir, a choir for young women, and it was co-founded by Brenda Zadorsky and John Barron in 1985. Brenda continues to conduct the AYS, Prima and the Amabile Young Women’s Ensemble. The Junior Amabile Singers (JAS) was founded in 1989 for younger girls. Today, the JAS and its training choir, Da Capo, are under the direction of Jacquelyn Norman and Wendy Landon. The Amabile Boys and Men’s Choirs, directed by Dr. Carol Beynon and Ken Fleet, were founded in 1990 to provide musical experiences of the highest level for male singers in South Western Ontario. Together, the continuum and depth that Amabile offers is unparalleled by any other choral organization in Canada and Amabile has achieved acclaim on national and world stages for its excellence in choral performance.

Kittie

Kittie

2010 Inductee

The Jack Richardson Music Awards steering committee is proud to induct one of London’s most successful and hardest-working bands, Kittie, into the London music hall of fame in 2010. The JRMA steering committee oversees inductions into the hall at the JRMA annual gala and continues to advocate for a London music hall of fame, hoping to see it one day move from dream to reality. Kittie was founded in London in 1996 by two sisters — drummer Mercedes and singer-guitarist Morgan Lander — as an all-female metal band. Kittie was soon playing clubs in London. The sisters were just 15 and 17 respectively when Kittie’s first album, “Spit,” was released on Artemis records. Kittie rose to success in 1999 when the track “Brackish” from “Spit” became a hit single. “Spit” was quickly Certified Gold and Kittie has sold more than 1.25 million albums worldwide. Kittie was nominated for a Juno as best new artist in 2000. Kittie has toured extensively, playing with such metal notables as Pantera and Slipknot. They have co-headlined the second stage at Ozzfest, performed on the Conan O’Brien show and hosted MTV’s Headbangers Ball. Between October and November of 2008, Kittie embarked on its first European tour in six years. The “Kittie Does Europe” tour included dates in the Netherlands, England, Scotland, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Russia. Kittie toured Europe again in the winter of 2010. Kittie released its fifth studio album “In the Black” in September, 2009. The sisters launched their own clothing line called Poisoned Black Clothing and a management company called X of Infamy. Kittie has been back on the road in North America earlier this year with God Forbid and then plays throughout the U.S. with Insane Clown Posse in May and June. Kittie’s members are the co-founding Lander sisters who have been joined by Tara McLeod on guitar and Ivy Vujic on bass in recent years. All four young women are part of the class of 2010, along with Amabile Choirs, as London music hall of fame inductees.

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